Dr. Tom Smith presenting on Machine Learning at the 3D Seismic Symposium on March 6th in Denver
What is the "holy grail" of Machine Learning in seismic interpretation? by Dr. Tom Smith, GSH Luncheon 2018
Using Attributes to Interpret the Environment of Deposition - A Video Course. Taught by Kurt Marfurt, Rocky Roden, and ChingWen Chen
Dr. Kurt Marfurt and Dr. Tom Smith featured in the July edition of AOGR on Machine Learning and Multi-Attribute Analysis
Rocky Roden and Ching Wen Chen in May edition of First Break - Interpretation of DHI Characteristics using Machine Learning

Envelope

Attribute Description: The Envelope attribute is one of the early complex trace attributes generated by Turhan Tanner, and Sven Treitel.  It forms the basis for many of the other single trace attributes used today.  It is the length of the vector between the Real and Imaginary trace (Hilbert Transform).

  This figure illustrates the real (amplitude), Hilbert transform, and Envelope traces.  The Envelope is red, the amplitude is blue, and Hilbert transform is green. 

This figure illustrates the real (amplitude), Hilbert transform, and Envelope traces.  The Envelope is red, the amplitude is blue, and Hilbert transform is green. 

Interpretation Use:  This attribute may provide value by:

  • Representing the layer based reflectivity
  • Acting as a DHI indicator
  • Highlighting thin bed tuning effects
  • Showing boundaries of sequences and depositional environments
  • Major lithologic changes
  • Showing layer effects over boundary effects

Recommended Colorbar: 

Since the distribution of this data is all positive, highlighting the very high values with unique colors, and using a gradational colorbar for the rest seem to highlight anomalous areas.

  Example colorbar and amplitude spectrum

Example colorbar and amplitude spectrum

Example

 Vertical display of Envelope

Vertical display of Envelope

 Time slice of Envelope

Time slice of Envelope

 Frequency Spectrum

Frequency Spectrum

Computation: The formula is comprised of the square root of the sum of the squares of the real and imaginary traces, or the Euclidian distance:

Envelope - 6.png

For a more detailed explanation of Envelope and other complex attributes, please read “Complex Trace Attributes” in this help section.

References:

  • Taner, M. T., 2001, Seismic attributes:  Canadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists Recorder, 26, no 7.